2 articles Tag memory

Understand the Memory of a Laptop

RAM (random access memory) is an important place in a computer where the application programs and data in use are stored so that processor can easily access this data. RAM is a short-term memory of your PC, and it can save a modest amount of information that is easy to access. You will need laptop reviews to find out thememory of your laptop. The RAM is almost 100 times faster than a hard drive or SSD but holds 100 times fewer data, and this data is temporary because the RAM will lose data as the power goes off. RAM is faster to read and write as compared to other types of computer storage, such as SSD (solid-state drive) and HDD (hard disk drive) or optical drive.

RAM will hold this data as long as the computer is running. As the computer turned off, the RAM will lose its data. As you turned on your computer again, the operating system and files are loaded once again in the RAM from SDD or HDD. Ram is small in physical size and storage capacity. A typical laptop may have 4 gigabytes RAM, but a hard disk can hold almost ten terabytes.

Types of RAM

Here are different types of RAMs available in the market, but the use of SDRAM memory is an old and plain memory that will slow your system down. There are various types of RAM, such as SDRAM, Rambus DRAM, and DDR.

SDRAM (Synchronous DRAM)

Nearly all systems are designed with 168-pin, 3.3-volt SDRAM DIMMs. It is not an extension of old EDO DRAM, but it is a new DRAM. SDRAMis run at 66 MHz, but the older fast page EDO and DRAM max out at nearly 50 MHz. The SDRAM can be scaled to PC133 (133 MHz) officially and unofficially almost 180MHz or even high. As the processor works faster, the advanced memory requires RDRAM and DDR for proper functioning.

Double Data Rate SDRAM (DDR)

DDR can double the speed of data transfer of SDRAM by transferring data according to the clock cycle. DDR memory operates at nearly 333 MHz or 166 MHz * 2 (aka PC2700 / PC333) or 1333 MHz * 2 (PC2100/PC266). Being 2.5-volt technology, the DDR uses 184 pins in DIMMs. It is not physically compatible with SDRAM but utilizes same parallel bus to make the implementation easy than RDRAM. RDRAM is a different technology.

Rambus RDRAM (DRAM)

Despite its high cost, the Intel has blessed the consumer market with RDRAM. This technology is specially designed for Pentium 4 of Intel. The RDRAM is a leading serial technology arrived in 3 flavors, such as PC 600, PC 700 and PC 800. The RDRAM PC 800 has increased the throughput of PC 100 SDRAM, but a sophisticated dormancy. The advanced RDRAM designs with numerous channels, such as the motherboard of Pentium 4 are at the top of the heap in the memory quantity, especially after pairing with PC-1066RDRAM memory.

DRAM is available in two important forms, such as RIMMs and DIMMs. RIMMs utilize only 16-bit interface, but it runs at a higher speed as compared to DDR. To enhance the performance, the chipsets of RDRAM require RIMMS instead of a dual 32-bit interface. The DIMMs contains 64-bit components, but if you want to use in a motherboard with dual configuration channel, you should pair them and enhance their performance.

 

Space in My Brain

During a conversation the other day (though I can’t remember who with, which will seem more poignant as this post mithers on), I started to think about all of the superfluous information that’s stored in my brain. I remember facts and figures, phone numbers, post codes, dates, even the registration numbers of cars that myself and my family have owned. The majority of this data is totally surplus to requirement, so wouldn’t it be great if we could do what we do with our hard drives, have a spring clean, delete the data we no longer need and free up some space for other stuff.

In 2009, I started a Psychology degree and one thing that struck me was that I struggled to retain information a lot more than when I was at school. I know that this is the curse of the Adult Learner, in fact, according to John Massari from Duke University “…¬†concepts of synaptic plasticity can be applied to improving the way we learn early in life. If certain kinds of activities are not learned during critical periods, it may difficult or even impossible to learn them later.”. In fact, he postulates that our brains change at around the age of 13. But it did all make me wonder if deleting my Nan’s postcode and the name of every teacher I’ve ever had would make space for data that’s more relevant to me now.

I’d love to be able to hook my brain up to a PC, trawl through my memory banks and delete all of the crap that I no longer need. A bit ‘Inception’-inspired, I suppose.

But then, this got me thinking too. What if I deleted the wrong data? I don’t mean like clicking format on the section that contains my name and address, I mean deleting the data that we, in our current lives, deem to be¬†unnecessary, only to discover that a minute event or occurrence is an intrinsic part of what makes us who we are. I could get rid of the name of my pen pal who I met in Hastings in 1992, only to realise that meeting her set me on a particular path.

So, I guess my question is this; what would you do? If you had the option to look at every individual file in your brain and delete the ones you no longer want or think you need, would you do it?

Just a bit of food for your already over-stuffed brain on this rainy Saturday morning!