3 articles Tag floor

Family Friendly Flooring – Wood you  look?

It’s no secret that as a nation us Brits love our pets, sometimes more than our own kids! However, when it comes to kitting out your home, both can pose as a bit of a problem. This is no exception with flooring and it can leave you feeling pretty limited when it comes to choice. Now, many experts would probably advise that you stay away from real wood flooring and play it safe with laminate or vinyl. However, if you’re someone who is looking to achieve that ever-increasing popular ‘rustic’ look and are able to deal with the odd dent or scratch then real wood might be the one for you!

Personally, we would recommend either Oak or Walnut flooring, purely because these materials are the most durable and cost-effective in the long run. Ian from IB Flooring says that “vinyl and lino flooring are very popular choices because of their practicality and versatility, ranging in vast a number of colours and designs.”

Oak is an incredibly popular choice when it comes to family-life. We all know how much mess children and pets can make, if you’re sick of plugging in the vacuum cleaner then why not consider Oak? It only requires a simple sweep and a once over with a mop (at a push), making it one of the easier to clean flooring options. Oak can withstand a lot of wear but if it does start to look dilapidated over the years then it can be re-sanded to bring back to life! Furthermore, Oak flooring does not collect dust or mould as easily as other floors, which makes it ideal if anyone in your household suffers from allergies.

Another thing to consider is what type of finish you want your floor to have. There are two prominent choices; Lacquered and Oiled, both have their advantages and disadvantages. Lacquered flooring will definitely get scratched more often, however it is a lot more durable, easier to clean and will brave the challenge of a pet extremely well.

On the other hand, oiled floor is harder to scratch, but the floor will need re-coating more frequently. The decision really depends on how committed you want to be when it comes to maintaining the quality of your floor.

There are a few things that you personally can do to ensure scratches are reduced; maintaining the length of your pet’s claws is one of the obvious ones. Also, add extra protection by laying rugs/runners down in areas that see heavier traffic from both humans and pets. As with all flooring, if you do have any mishaps or spillages then try to clean them up as soon as possible to avoid stains and marks from occurring.

So there you have it, just a few reasons why Luxury Flooring think that the real thing is the best for your family home!

Mummy On-the-Go: Finding a Floor Rug That Isn’t Your Foe


When living in small rented bungalows, personalising the living space means working within the landlord’s boundaries. My husband and I are to some degree limited with how stylish we can actually make our place. Let’s get real – rental cabinetry, hardware, and middle-of-the-road carpet quality are not really our style. Switching these things would make a huge difference, if rental property rules weren’t so black and white. So when we wanted to make our girls’ bedroom theirs, I had to look for a minimal-effort, easily changed décor ingredient that still delivers a richly textured scheme. I decided to go with a floor rug.

Beside defining a space, throw rugs come in an assortment of colours and textures and are the easiest way to add warmth and style to a room. In a way, area rugs are like cocktails – they are the first foray into a menu and contribute to the overall atmosphere of a party. Knowing that the rug I choose will either make or break the room, I had to choose wisely. However I wasn’t sure whether I should focus on making a grand statement, or if design should take second place to durability. Between my kids eating and playing, and our spunky English Bull Terrier, I knew the rug would take a beating. I needed something tough and kid proof.

After few days of CSI-style online investigating and a Sherlock Holmes-esque intuition (the being-mother talent I’ve mastered over the years), I finally decided to go with a striped floor rug in an array of cool, pastel rainbow colours. It’s hand-loomed and hand-tufted out of 100% Japanese acrylic.


I did first consider natural fiber rugs as they are advertised as the safest and child friendly. I was leaning more towards cotton, mainly because it’s a natural product that is strong yet budget-friendly. Also, cotton area rugs are usually made in a flat wave, toys slide across easily and I thought cleaning would be a breeze. However, after researching, I learned that with time, cotton fibers get matted and tend to accumulate dander and dirt particles easily.

I then thought of wool, but learned these are quite hard to clean. Using a vacuum’s rotary brush is not recommended (fiber may fuzz) and neither is DIY deep-cleaning, because the majority of store bought cleaners are high in alkaline which can damage fibers. Also, since wool fibers absorb more water, they are harder to dry. Wool was therefore off the list as well.

I had to consider what was safest to go below my girls’ feet. Since they spend plenty of time in their room, I wanted something that would be able to withstand rough handling – Sausage’s painting and crafting mishaps and BB’s inevitable spills and potty accidents. After weighing all the options, I knew Japanese acrylic was the way to go.

Although made of man-made fibers, it’s lightweight and made in short pile so it doesn’t permanently trap every crumb. The rug feels and looks like wool, less the staggering price tag and risk of airborne allergies. It is warm, plush, soft and feels springy underfoot. The acrylic helps the rug breathe (absorb and release moisture), and has good resistance to oil and stains. The backing is made of cotton which not only ensures the durability of the rug, but also reduces odours. And best of all, it is actually very easy to clean.

I usually roll it up, put it out in the front yard and clean it with a mild dish detergent (never a laundry detergent) and water. This is the best combination to attack ink markers and chocolate stains. Because I power-wash the rug once or twice a year, every few weeks I deodorize it with baking soda. Between soft drink spills, BB’s potty training accidents and the rare occasions when Chuck drags his hind end on the floor, the funky odours are certain. The power of baking soda helps me avoid the unavoidable. I simply sprinkle a generous amount of baking soda on the rug, let it sit for few hours and vacuum. Oftentimes, I also shake it to remove dust, because let’s be realistic, vacuums do miss a lot of dirt (even with frequent vacuuming).

What I like more than the easy-to-clean feature is that the rug perfectly defines the girls’ Dulux’s Storybook bedroom design. It adds the just-right pop of colour. Plus there’s that added safety when BB is playing on the floor. It’s thick, sturdy and still, so BB’s feet do not get stuck on the corners and there’s no tripping. It also offers a decent cushioning to BB’s falls and bumps.

Simply put, the rug serves its purpose. Plus, I love the idea of girls having a soft, safe and clean area where they can indulge in reading and envelop in their favourite make-believe coffee shop game.

The Trouble With Renting…

This post was written in collaboration with CarpetRight
dirty carpet

One of the problems with living in a rented house is that we’re very much at the mercy of our landlord when things need fixing. Largely, he’s pretty good and he’ll send a tradesman over to sort things out, or attend to it himself if he’s in the country. However, there are certain things which aren’t seen to in such a timely fashion, such as our truly, completely grim living room carpet.

When we moved in, the landlord had refurbished the house, removing the old laminate and replacing it with new carpet. Now, this might seem like a nice thing, having brand new carpet in a rented  house, but in our case it was a curse. You see, our landlord chose a beige patterned carpet, knowing at the time that we had a toddler and a dog, and that the patio doors in our living room were the only way to get in an out of the garden. Skip forward three and a half years and our carpet is looking less beige and more ‘interesting collection of stains’.

If Husband and I owned the house, we’d replace the carpet with cheap laminate flooring, which would solve so many problems – it would be easy to keep clean, it would look SO much nicer than what we have now, and it would save our nerves from jangling every time Chuck comes in from the garden in the winter and we have to quickly try and clean the mud off of his feet before he steps on the carpet!

I’m by no means innocent myself. I’m terrible for leaving drinks on the floor and then inevitably kicking them over as I weave my way through the house like a bull in a china shop, which means several of the stains can be attributed to me. Luckily, I’m not a big drinker, or else red wines stains could have made the situation a whole lot worse!

We’ve asked our landlord if he could think about replacing the carpet with laminate, as we’ve lived here for a while now and aren’t planning on moving any time soon, so hopefully he’ll see sense and sort it out for us, but I can understand why he’d be reluctant to do so, this close to Christmas. All I know is, between my drinks, Chuck’s muddy feet, Sausage’s melted crayons and Husband’s…well, actually, no, Husband is the one innocent party on all of this; something needs to change, because the thought of a baby crawling on our carpet (despite the fact that we’ve had it professionally cleaned TWICE!) is not one that appeals to any of us.