2 articles Tag electric

Why to Consider Buying Green

When it comes to electric cars it’s no longer a case of if but when. The government has announced that we won’t be able to buy new petrol or diesel cars in the UK from 2030 onwards and even plug-in hybrids will be no longer from 2035, so electric looks like being your main option.

Electric car sales are on the rise already, though, with plenty of people recognising the plus-sides to EVs. They are cheaper to fuel and you can do it from home or at work in many cases, they can drive into city centres without paying charges (where they apply) and you don’t have to pay anywhere near as much tax.

That’s before you consider the fact that they are quiet to drive, often have lots of modern tech and many are good to drive.

If you are considering going green, then these cars would be a good place to start, plus you can find out how much your current car’s worth with an online valuation from market experts, Parkers.

Volkswagen ID.3

Volkswagen’s Beetle enabled many people to get behind the wheel of a car for the first time when it first launched – could the ID.3 do the same with electric?

It’s VW’s first purpose built electric car (VW did make electric versions of the Golf and Up, though) but there will be lots of other ‘ID’ EVs to come from the brand. It looks different to other VWs, to set it apart, but it still offers a great level of family-friendly practicality and ease of use.

There’s space for five, it feels spacious inside and it feels familiar and accessible when it comes to driving it. There is a choice of ranges, too, with an impressive 260 or 336 miles possible.

Tesla Model 3

Despite the company’s relative newness, no list of electric cars is complete without a Tesla these days. The Model 3 is the cheapest one in the brand’s range but it still comes with a load of the fancy tech that Tesla is famed for now.

The thing that will tempt many, though, is the promised 353-mile range – that should be enough for most long-distance trips. It’s really quick and fun to drive, too, so it’s little surprise that it is shooting up the sales charts [https://www.smmt.co.uk/vehicle-data/car-registrations/] to become one of the more popular cars on sale in the UK full stop.

Polestar 2

If you thought Tesla was a newbie then compared to Polestar it is an established household name. However, there is more to it than that as this is an electric-only arm of Volvo. It’s also the company that is Tesla’s closest rival, offering some up-to-the-minute features like vegan interiors, although it doesn’t have as many gimmicks as some rivals with a minimalist cabin with very few buttons. Think the sort of living room that pops up in those Scandi dramas that are so popular. It’s smart and sophisticated rather than dripping with showy tech.

The range is impressive, although not quite at the level of the Tesla and ID.3 – it tops out at 292 officially. It’s not the most spacious of cabins compared to some, but it still has enough room to appeal to family buyers.

Citroen e-C4

One of the big benefits of electric cars is that they are less stressful to drive – there is much less noise and vibration and the lack of gears etc mean they are relaxing on the road.

The Citroen e-C4 majors on this, and makes for a really smooth driving experience with a comfy ride and seats. While it isn’t a dedicated EV (there are petrol and diesel versions too) it was designed to be an electric car from the start.

The range isn’t as headline grabbing as some of the other new electric cars, but at 217 miles it will cope with almost everything for the majority of drivers. And it is capable of a lot more than the electric cars of only a few years ago.

Kia Soul

Not everyone who buys an electric car wants to slip into the background unnoticed – you might want to make a statement with your funky new battery-powered wheels.

The Kia Soul is certainly distinctively looking, although its boxy shape means it still has a decent-sized and airy cabin, even if it isn’t the biggest or most practical out there.

It’s quick and fun to drive, too – 0-62mph comes in just 7.9 seconds and it has a claimed range of 280 miles.

Dealing With Utility Companies When Moving Home

What are the most stressful things you can do in your life? The top five are often listed as the death of a loved one, losing your job, a major illness, divorce and… moving home. Moving home is a hugely stressful experience which is compounded by several factors. There are things which are exciting and as well as those which we face with trepidation, starting out in a new area, perhaps unfamiliar area, making new friends and getting to know neighbours or packing up and transporting a lifetime of memories.

Then there are the more mundane aspects of moving home, such as sorting out bills, notifying utility suppliers and getting your new home all hooked up. Anyone who has recently moved home will know that whilst these aspects of moving are much more humdrum, they can end up being some of the most  frustrating aspects of moving home and are ones which you need to get on top of.

Why do I need to contact my new supplier(s)

When you move into your new home one of the first things you should do is to note down any meter readings and notify utility suppliers. This is to prevent you being charged for any usage by the previous occupants and for your utility suppliers to only charge you for what you have used. It does not have to tie you into a contract with them as many electricity and gas suppliers will simply put you on a rolling contract till such time as you either sign up for a specific tariff (which is advisable to get the best rate) or till you switch providers.

Finding my utility suppliers

If you have recently moved home you will need to find out who your new utility suppliers (electricity, gas, water and telephone/ broadband) are.

Who is my energy supplier?

The easiest way to find out who supplies the electricity, and gas if you have it, at your new property is to contact the previous owner, tenant or landlord. If you are purchasing your property, and are in contact with the seller,  either they or the estate agent may be able to help you. If you are moving into rented accommodation try contacting the letting agent and landlord to find out. What you should not do is wait till you start to receive bills from the supplier.

This is because the energy supplier may not know who is residing at the property, whether or not it is occupied, and most likely will be using estimated billing. Noting down the meter readings when you move in and supplying these to the appropriate providers will remove that and allow you to get on the best possible plan, tariff or contract for your usage.

If you aren’t having much luck getting in contact with the previous residents/ owners or landlord you can find out who your gas supplier is by calling the Meter Point Administration service (0870 608 1524). They can help find your home’s supplier and will issue with a Meter Point Reference Number for future calls to them.

For more ways to find out who your current energy supplier is, you can read more in this handy guide to who is my gas and electricity provider.

Who is my water supplier?

Finding out your new water supplier is much easier than finding your gas and electricity provider. This is because water is still a more regulated field with each water supplier only operating within a specific geographical area. You can look up who your new water supplier is, as well as their contact info with this handy guide from Water UK

Broadband and telephone suppliers

utility companiesWhen you move to a new property it is likely that any telephone and broadband supply will have been cut off and will likely need to be reconnected. If you are still within the minimum term of your existing contract with a provider you will need to remain with them and simply be reconnected at your new address with your existing account.

It is possible to get out of such contracts but this usually comes with a heavy penalty. You will need to notify your broadband and telephone supplier prior to moving (around a month before hand is the best amount of time). Inform them of your moving date, new address and whether or not you want to bring your account with you to your new home. Book in any broadband or TV service installations before your moving date to secure an engineers visit as close to when you move in as possible.

If you are outside your minimum term contract then you can begin to look at and compare other telephone, broadband and tv providers to find the best possible package for you. There can be pitfalls and problems when changing contracts as you move home. Broadband.co.uk have a great guide on what to expect and how to navigate through any potential issues you might have.