3 articles Tag colic

Surviving Colic

Baby ColicBefore I had Burrito Baby, I’d read about colic and knew that it basically just involved unexplained crying for hours on end. I read scary statistics about how it affects the mental health of the new mother, was responsible for relationship breakdowns at its worst and had also been known to cause bonding issues with the new baby. What I didn’t know, at the time, is that the reality of living with a colicy baby can be all of the above and worse. BB was fine she first came home. She fed well, slept pretty well and it seemed like life as a foursome would be pretty easy. Then the colic started.

When I tell people that, for roughly first 4 months of BB’s life that, if she was awake she was usually screaming, they don’t believe me. But I promise, it’s genuinely not an exaggeration. Because she was in pain for most of the time and impossible to comfort, it became really hard to enjoy her babyhood. I’ve never been the sort of parent to make the “Oh really? You can have her if you want!” jokes when people say how cute my baby is, but with BB I started to do it. Not because I really wanted someone to take her away; I suppose I just wanted a flicker of recognition from someone, another person to say “Yeah, I know, it sucks sometimes doesn’t it?”.

We tried a whole bunch of different remedies, different formulas, warm baths, bobbing, shushing, rocking, driving her round at 3am, taking her for walks in the pram in the middle of the night – nothing worked. I really wish I’d known about Nelsons Colica Colic Granules at the time because they may well have been the thing to help BB. Nelsons Colica Colic Granules cost £5.80 from Boots, Amazon and Morrisons and contain a unique formulation of a 30c potency of natural Citrullus colocynthis and Dioscorea villas.

All of the advice that we received regarding colic during that time was from friends and family, or found online, and was mostly anecdotal. Every time we thought we’d found something which helped BB, it stopped working as soon as it started which was really demoralising. The feeling of thinking you’ve found a way to help, only to end up back at square one, is really difficult to deal with and I won’t lie, it really affected my mental health. Not only could I not help my baby, but our house was an unpleasant place to be for all of us because BB was either screaming or we’d have to creep around for fear of waking her and have the screaming start all over again. I felt lik ethe weight of the entire world was on my shoulders.

The best advice I can give is this: things WILL get better. Go to your G.P. or pharmacist if you think your baby needs additional help, but over time your baby will definitely grow out of colic. I know things might seem horrible right now, but it does end and you WILL be able to enjoy your baby again.

Please take a look at the Nelsons Facebook page for more information and handy tips.

“Is She a Good Baby?”

good baby bad baby“Does she feed well?”

Um, no, not really…

“Does she cry much?”

Well, yes, quite a lot actually

“Does she sleep well?”

She does…eventually. Once we manage to get her to sleep she usually stays that way, but it often takes her a while to get there.

These are usually peoples’ main qualifiers when they’re trying to work out if Buritto Baby is a ‘GOOD BABY’ or not, and I’m sad to say that she falls short in every category. I see peoples look of vague annoyance when I’m honest and say “well, actually, no!” when they ask these questions, like I shouldn’t be honest, like I’m betraying my baby by admitting her issues. Or maybe they just don’t want to hear the truth…supermarket chitchat should be light and happy, not filled with brutal honesty.

If I’m honest, I HATE the term ‘good baby’. No baby is born bad, and if they are falling short of the ridiculous eating/sleeping/crying standards that society seems to place on them, then there must be something missing or a cause for the unsettledness.

So, BB can be fussy with her food. She cries more than average babies. It takes her until midnight, some nights, to get to sleep. Does that make her a BAD baby? Does that mean that Husband, Sausage and I should be any less enamoured with her? Does it mean that her laughs and smiles and moments of happiness should be ignored, because BAD babies are simply BAD and nothing else?

No.

It does not.

I don’t care if BB doesn’t meet the requirements to be considered a good baby. I don’t care if YOUR baby breastfeeds until its 12, sleeps through the night from birth and has never so much as uttered a cry – that doesn’t make your baby better than ours, it just makes it different.

And besides, Sausage was the PERFECT baby, so we can’t expect lightening to strike twice, can we…?!

Living With a Baby Who Cries a Lot

crying-babySausage was a very quiet, chilled out baby. People often commented how little she cried and how she always seemed so content. The same cannot be said for Burrito Baby. BB has been dealing with a horrid combination of reflux, constipation and colic. Her special reflux milk causes constipation. The Infacol worsens the reflux. No one can tell us what causes colic but it all just seems to be a vicious circle which conspires to keep our baby in pain. Babies who are in pain cry. A lot.

Living with a baby who cries a lot makes you feel like you’re failing as a parent. 

Living with a baby who cries a lot means that every moment when they aren’t crying feels like a small victory. 

Living with a baby who cries a lot means that although every moment when they aren’t crying feels like a small victory, you live in a state of anxiety because it could start all over again at any moment. 

Living with a baby who cries a lot means that you feel utterly guilty for not being able to soothe their pain.

Living with a baby who cries a lot means that you feel utterly guilty for being relieved once they fall asleep. 

Living with a baby who cries a lot means that you’ll try just about anything to stop them from crying. 

Living with a baby who cries a lot means that it’s not unusual to find you bathing them, walking them around the block in their pram, driving them around, pacing around with them in a sling…all at midnight. 

Living with a baby who cries a lot means that you’ll feel closer to the end of your tether than you’ve ever felt before.

Living with a baby who cries a lot means that you feel as though your heart is going to break when you look at their pained, pleading face and realise you don’t know how to help them.  

Living with a baby who cries a lot means that you feel as though you can’t go on, that you’ve got nothing left to give…

but you do go on. 

You find that shred of resolve that’s hiding deep inside you and you go on, and eventually the crying stops, and although you feel as though you have pins and needles in your brain you use the quiet time to mend your weary soul so that you have what it takes to deal with the crying, if and when it starts all over again. 

BB has now been given Ranitidine for her reflux, which seems to helping. We’re so sick of seeing her in pain and feeling like nothing we do is helping, but we’re really hoping this will help her turn a corner. Dealing with this has made me realise how hard single-parenthood must be at times like this, and I’m hugely thankful that I have Husband on my team, doing late-night walks around the block with BB when nothing else will settle her.

Team Crammond vs. reflux – We will win.