Health

Top Tips For Coping With Dental Anxiety

Top Tips For Coping With Dental Anxiety
Photo by Caroline LM on Unsplash

Dentistry-related anxiety is a very common problem faced by people of all ages. The roots of this anxiety may vary from person to person, but there are a number of common symptoms, including a racing heartbeat, sweating, crying, and possibly even fainting.

Some people may find their anxiety so difficult to cope with that they avoid going to the dentist altogether – which can have repercussions for their dental health.

If you find yourself struggling with the unpleasant symptoms of dental dread, don’t despair – there are some tips and techniques that may prove helpful and make your next dental appointment feel much more manageable.

Continue reading “Top Tips For Coping With Dental Anxiety”
Family · Home · Kids

Moving With Kids: 5 Tips To Make It Easier And Less Stressful

Moving With Kids: 5 Tips To Make It Easier And Less StressfulMoving can be quite challenging and having your kids with you during this time can make the transition all the more difficult. Children feel safe at a home where they grew up in. They also feel comfortable with the neighborhood, school, and friends they already know. While moving can bring about a lot of excitement to kids, it can also bring out anxiety.

While it’s impossible to eliminate all the challenges you’ll have to face when moving with your children, there are tips that can assist you in making it easier and less stressful.

 

1. Inform Your Kids About The Move Early On

It’s essential that you inform them about the move in advance. You can have a family meeting to announce it. Whether moving is already kind of a regular occurrence or not for your family, it is still a big deal for everyoneespecially your kids. It’s guaranteed that you’ll get some reactions from everyone, but you can offer them pizza or any other food to help them stay calm during the announcement.

Having the meeting sooner than later is a good thing to do. Why? Because it can assist you in explaining to your children why are you moving and other details about the move. Taking the time to inform and talk to your kids about the move can help address the anxieties, frustrations, and concerns they have about the move. It can also help you reassure your children that everything is going to be alright.

2. Hire A Moving Company

If you want the move to be smooth and easy, you should consider hiring a moving company. Things can get very messy on moving day and it’s going to be more challenging for you if you have kids. But if you hire a moving company that can help you out, you’ll find it very convenient.

If you need to dispose of waste and old furniture before moving out, you can hire waste removal companies that can collect all kinds of rubbish for you. This even includes large appliances, toxic wastes, and yard wastes that must be removed before moving. You can visit https://www.dirtcheaprubbishremoval.com.au/ to see what a waste removal service can do for you.

3. Get Your Kids Involved

Involving all your children in the moving process is very beneficial. It can empower them and help prevent making them feel like they’re helpless. As you create a moving-to-do-list, make sure that you have tasks for your kids that they can easily handle. Even a small moving task such as packing their toys can make a big difference from their perspective.

Kids love to help out. Rather than telling them that they are too young to help on moving day, your children will love to hear that you have prepared some tasks for them! If your kids are old enough, you can have them help you pack, arrange toys, or pickup boxes.

You might want to give each of your child separate tasks such as packing up and cleaning the rooms, packing boxes, or takingcare of their younger siblings. These things will help keep them engaged and involved with the whole process.

4. Visit The New Place You’re Moving To

If you can, you should visit the new place you’re moving to along with your kids before the big day. A visit like this can give them an idea of the new place and make it familiar instead of being a mystery for them.

Before you make a visit, be sure to grab a copy of the local newspaper to find out about any kid-friendly activities that may be happening during your scheduled visit. Taking a look at the local kid’s playground or recreational center can help reassure your kids about the new place. They will start thinking that the new neighborhood is not so bad after all.

5. Have A Positive Mindset

On moving day, your mood could also affect your kids. So, if you’re cheerful and excited, they’ll also feel the same way. But if you’re too stressed and frustrated because things are not going according to plan, expect your kids to feel the same way too.

Final Thoughts

If you’re relocating with kids, the tips above can help you make the whole process easier and less stressful not just for them, but yours as well. Taking the time to prepare your children and hiring a moving company to help you out can make a lot of difference when you’re moving with kids.

Health · Mental Health

Five Signs of Anxiety a Counselor Will Spot

Five Signs of Anxiety a Counselor Will Spot
Photo by Tonik on Unsplash

Anxiety is one of the most common forms of mental illness, with an estimated 1 in six people suffering from some sort of anxiety. For many of us, anxiety os something that we live with on  day to day basis, barely recognising the varying symptoms that we’re dealing with. However, knowing the different ways in which your anxiety manifests itself can be half of the battle in dealing with it, so I’ve put together a list of five of the most common signs of anxiety that your BetterHelp counselor will spot, even if you don’t:

Hyperactivity

While you may just think you’re being motivated and getting things done, going on a sudden overactive kick of doing something could be a sign of anxiety. Cleaning the house from top to bottom, overexercising or even talking too much can all be ways that we try to distract ourselves while dealing with the excess energy that anxiety can produce.

Irritability

Most people associate feelings of aniety with fear and worry, but for many people, aniety can actually look like irritability and snappiness. This is often due to the racing thoughts and feeling on edge that the excess adrenaline in your system causes. If someone close to you seems snappy and less tolerant than usual, try to remember that it’s not your fault and could be due to their anxiety.

Hoarding

We’ve all seen the “Extreme Hoarders” programmes on TV, where people live in houses which are so full of stuff that they have to climb over a virtual assault course just to get to bed, but hoarding doesn’t always look like this. Often, people who are hoarding because of anxiety will pick one item which is significant to them and hold onto it because it gives them some sense of comfort.

Dissociation

Dissociation is a feeling of being disconnected from your thoughts, feelings, memories, and surroundings. Often, when people are dealing with Dissociation, they don’t even realise that this is what they’re dealing with, and it’s only when they explain their feelings to a mental health professional that they realise thi is what’s happening. It sometimes resolves itself, but seeking help from a counselor is vital. 

Physical Symptoms

There are many physical symptoms which can result from having anxiety, and it’s not uncommon for sufferers to belive they’re having a serious health problem, such as a heat attack, when these symptoms occur. Sweating, heavy and fast breathing, hot flushes or blushing, dry mouth, shaking, hair loss, fast heartbeat, extreme tiredness or lack of energy, dizziness and fainting, and stomach aches and sickness are ALL symptoms which can result from anxiety and can all make you believe you have a physical sickness.

Depression

How to Help Someone You Love Who is Suffering from Depression

With 1 in 4 individuals living in the UK suffering from a mental illness, it is likely that someone in your family or friends group is one of those people. From depression to border-line personality disorder, there is always one recurring factor that must be remembered. Seek help. The more support within a sufferer’s life, the less pressurised they feel to wallow in their irrational shame and isolation.

By reading this article, I hope to enlighten your world with ways in which you can help those in your life coping with depression. But don’t worry if they don’t reach out to you immediately. Something with such a mind-numbing pain attached can often take the person time to understand and cope with it themselves.

Understanding Depression

The first step to caring for those you love is through understanding the illness itself. Without the knowledge of how the illness is affecting them and others, there is no real relevant way that you can help. However, as each individual has their own experience of depressive symptoms, it is advised to let them explain how they feel first. Once this has been established, then you can begin to cushion the impact for them. For example, if they feel as though they are isolated from the world and this is creating an overt sense of depression, then make them aware that you are always available for company or even a simple cup of tea.

Despite this, people with mental illnesses also tend to value their time alone to reflect and get to know themselves, so you should definitely avoid any form of smothering.  Nevertheless, with a gentle reminder that you are there for them, this can go a long way.

Another way in which you can help your loved one is through the boosting of their low self-esteem. With depression, it is almost guaranteed that the way in which they feel about themselves is fairly negative. But if you want to care for them, then reinforcing a cycle of positivity can help with this. So, if they have decided to get out of bed, or are looking more cheerful on those better days, then don’t forget to remind them of this. With the occasional complimentary comment, you can help to break their negative thought pattern, reminding them that they always have been, and of course always will be a beautiful person.

Don’t Make It All About You and Your Experiences… Just Let Them Talk

If you also suffer from depression yourself, I am sure you are aware that there is nothing worse than people smothering you with their stories of how they overcame their illness. In one way, they probably believe that by telling you about their experiences, this will automatically benefit you; however, it doesn’t. As I’ve mentioned before, each individual person suffers from their own specific depressive symptoms, meaning that just because you’ve overcome your illness, by following the same path they can too. This is a common mistake and can often make those being talked at feel insignificant and overwhelmed.

The first step to success in this area is to make it obvious that you are available to talk. By extending this invitation, this then provides them with the opportunity to accept whenever they feel comfortable and ready to open up. As the first discussion can be overpowering, then you must be prepared for tears and snotty messes; but once they come to terms with their depression, and accept that they need help, then it can only go up from there. It is also important to remember that often when people discuss their mental illness, they feel ashamed of their ‘weaknesses’. However, as a stigma that needs to be destroyed, you must make them aware that it is okay to feel down. It is the recovery and learning to love yourself that is important. By doing so, you’ll reinforce this significantly important mantra: Your mental illness does not define you!

Every Little Helps

A further method support is to reinforce the importance of maintaining their typical everyday schedule. When suffering from depression, an ordinary routine can often become overwhelming, causing isolation and sadness to consume them as you feel as though they cannot leave their bed. This can often lead to difficulties regarding money, especially if they convince themselves that going into work is not an option. However, by contacting advice services such as Mental Health and Money Advice, professionals who understand will be able to create a plan of guidance and offer you services into how to help someone with poor mental health with their expenses.

By following the aide of this article, I hope that you will be able to alleviate the suffering of your loved one. As such a common problem in the UK, I know how consuming mental illnesses can be. However, with your support, you should be able to encourage your family member or friend to open up and seek the support that they so desperately deserve.

Mental Health · Personal

The Lonely Toothbrush

If you read this blog with any kind of regularity, you’ve probably noticed by now that I’m a little bit…unusual? Between my magpie obsession, my lack of direction and wanting to wipe my brain like a hard drive,  it’s fair to say that I err on the side of the slightly eccentric. However, I realised something about myself today that we can add to the ever-growing list of unusual pathological behaviors;  I have an unusual aversion to loneliness.

Now, I appreciate than an aversion to loneliness in and of itself isn’t that unusual. As humans, we’re programmed to believe in safety in numbers and there’s been absolutely masses of research into the psychology and anthropology behind loneliness – according to Wikipedia “Loneliness has also been described as social pain — a psychological mechanism meant to alert an individual of isolation and motivate him/her to seek social connections”. Loneliness and our feeling about it are central to The Human Condition. But see, this is the thing – for me, it’s not just about humans…

Don’t get me wrong, I have a special pain in my heart and stomach that kicks in when I think about how many old people there are in the world who’ve been left on their own and feel a deep sense of loneliness, that’s all there. But this morning, whilst in the shower, I became deeply disturbed by the living arrangement of our toothbrushes. We have two glasses, mounted above the bathroom sink in which our dental care accouterments live. Today, mine and Husband’s brushes were in one glass with the toothpastes and Sausage’s was by itself in the other.

By itself.

All alone.

So I moved it.

I rearranged everything so that all three of our toothbrushes were in one glass, together, so that no one toothbrush got lonely. It moved me to significant enough sadness that I had to take action.

And now I sit and think about it, I do it with other things too. If I’m making beans or spaghetti on toast, I dutifully bang the bottom of the tin until every last bean or hoop falls from the tin. Not because I’m tight or greedy, simply because if that bean or hoop goes into the bin in a can by itself, it might get lonely. I genuinely have anxiety about lonely legumes.

I realise I’m probably really asking you to plumb the depths of your tolerance to sympathise with me here; the majority of you nice, sane people are probably wondering where the nearest loony bin is that I can be flung into, but I do wonder where this feeling comes from. As much as I’d never crave loneliness, I’m perfectly happy in my own company. I quite enjoy my drive to work, along the seafront, listening to BBC Radio 2, singing if I feel like it. At lunchtime, I try to get away from my desk if I can and have 5 minutes to myself. It’s not like I can’t stand to be alone.

Why do I rate the beans and hoops and toothbrushes more highly than myself, when it comes to company?

Answers on a postcard, dear readers…