Travel

Travelling In 2022: How To Prepare

Are you thinking of going on a travel adventure in 2022? There are so many fun things that you can go and do now that a lot of the restrictions have eased, and we are no longer in lockdown. It’s still controversial for some people as some say that nobody should be travelling at the moment until the world is all clear of COVID. However, this is unlikely to ever happen, and as such, you shouldn’t put off travelling for this. In this article, we’re going to be taking a look at some of the things that you can do to prepare for travelling in 2022! Keep reading if you would like to find out more.

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Travel

Tips for Planning out faith based tours in Europe

Faith based tours
Photo by Biel Morro on Unsplash

On the topic of organizing religious tourism it should be mentioned that it is a special activity related to the provision of services and the satisfaction of the needs of tourists who travel to sacred religious centers outside their usual environment.

Some tourists prefer to travel for religious purposes and in some cases leave the country for a long period of time, for example, at least six months to visit holy places as well as religious centers. Religious tourism has become particularly popular today, when tourists have many opportunities to travel to other countries as well, especially in Europe.

Target audience for faith based tours

Religious tourism is a promising and quite fascinating sphere of tourism, since it allows to make trips to different places, visiting the oldest monuments that are important not only for religion, but also for the development of art, culture, related to any historical event. In addition, the given orientation of the rest attracts not only believers, but also those who want to learn more about the architecture of temples, churches, various religious constructions, to know their interior decoration and their specific environment. Thus culture and religion overlap in this aspect.

Some people go on religious journeys to purify their souls, as well as to find inner peace and balance. Thus, the pilgrimage was practiced even before the birth of Christ, and now it is also practiced by various categories of tourists. It is very important to know who the target audience is for these faith based tours as it can help plan them better.

Types of faith based tours to prepare

In this way, the following types of religious tourism are distinguished:

Pilgrimage – It represents the desire of believers to worship holy places. Pilgrims have a variety of purposes, such as the desire to pray to God and be closer to him, to find grace, to carry out God’s work, atone for sins, to express gratitude for a good event, etc. The pilgrims, contrary to the opinion of some people, are not religious fanatics, but dedicated and learned people.

Because pilgrims travel long distances, they need to possess the quality of intelligence to communicate with strangers, as well as the ability to count on their strength. Modern pilgrims use the many comforts of civilization to make their travels. Now, this requires a certain amount of money, as well as documents that allow them to reach a certain country, but is a non-issue for European tours.

Religious and cultural tourism – Travel in the religious tourism format involves not only the worship of church relics, buildings, structures, or other objects, but also a general knowledge of the culture and religion of a particular place, which is also of educational interest. Tourists in this direction do not seek to achieve any enlightenment, forgive their sins, they just want to travel and see new corners of our world. For these types of tours it’s great to mix in general local culture elements to keep the audience hooked.

Learning from the history of the religious tourism industry

Religious tourism as a destination has existed since ancient times. However, religious tourists used to travel independently, without the help of any tourist organization. Their goal was to visit temples, cathedrals, monasteries and places of preservation of sacred relics.

The first mention of religious tourism dates back to ancient times, when the ancient Greeks visited Delphi. Pilgrimage tourism is mentioned later in the Middle Ages, when the Crusades gained special importance. In particular, under religious guidance the military operations against a particular state were hidden, so that religious travel at that time has acquired a special political significance.

In the second half of the 19th century, religious tourism began to acquire an organized character. For example, in France there were annual trips to atone for sins.

Characteristics of religious tours to help with organizing

To date, religious visits are the most common. However, when organizing religious visits it is necessary to take into account several aspects:

The address of the tour. The direction of the visit is determined based on the faith that the tourist has or the specific place that he must visit. Therefore, tour operators and travel agents must be well oriented in the available directions and be able to offer the tourist the right product.

The tour route. The tourist’s itinerary must be configured in such a way that the religious feelings of the tourist are not hurt, so that visits to places that may be unpleasant for the tourist are excluded.

Means of transportation. In many countries, the movement through the holy places is carried out by various types of land transport, most of the time by bus, since it allows not only to know the religious monuments, but also to see the daily life and way of life of the people who live there, in addition to knowing the natural attractions.

Designation of tour rules. Religious tourism, like no other, requires strict regulations. People can even carelessly offend the feelings of believers, so it is necessary to know the rules of conduct not only in the temple, but also in other holy places. Otherwise, the consequences can be deplorable, up to imprisonment, especially abroad. To avoid problems for tourists, it is necessary to explain the rules of conduct in a certain place. In addition, it is necessary to stipulate the way of dressing, for example, there are places where it is necessary to put a scarf on the head, it is forbidden to expose certain parts of the body, etc. It is necessary to remember that they have little free time, and it cannot be spent in constant discussions with travelers.

Keep in mind that you can always seek out the help of a professional tour operator for faith based tours in Europe that can help with the journey. When going on a religious tour, tourists should also remember that religious tourism is not a means of entertainment and fun. It is above all an opportunity to change the vision of the world, to learn new things, and to let go of negative emotions and experiences.

Holidays · Travel

Five Reasons to Tour the UK by Train

Five Reasons to Tour the UK by Train
Photo by Denis Chick on Unsplash

With restrictions on international travel still in place for many countries, there’s never been a better time to spend some time travelling around dear old Blighty! There are lots of places in the UK which rival the rest of the world in terms of beauty and many people never bother to tour our shores, choosing instead to travel abroad for their holidays. With that in mind, we thought we’d look at some of the reasons that travelling the UK by train is a great idea:

Better for the Environment

We all know that visiting new places is exciting, but have you ever thought about your carbon footprint while travelling? Rail transport is actually the most environment-friendly way to travel. The greenhouse effect of gas emissions per kilometer on railway transport is 80% less than cars. In some countries, less than 3% of all transport gas emissions come from trains.

Look at the Views

It’s great being a passenger in a car as you can look out of the window at all of the wonderful views on your journey. However, being a driver means that your view is a lot more limited for reasons of safety, so drivers rarely get to enjoy the scenery. If you travel by train, you can spend the whole journey taking in the view, and you’ll often get to see things that you wouldn’t be able to from a motorway.

No Limit on Luggage

While we aren’t suggesting that you should pack everything including the kitchen sink when travelling by train, you’re not limited by a baggage weight limit. This means that you can pack more if you travel by train than you can if you travel by plane, which saves a lot of worrying and weighing suitcases before you leave!

Efficient Routes

When you travel by road, you’re at the mercy of roads, traffic and all sorts of other things that make your journey long and potentially stressful. With trains, you generally go in a pretty straight line from A to B and you don’t have to worry about traffic or other road users. It’s also usually much quicker because of this. Many people who travel by train find it the most relaxing way to travel.

Stay Connected

Charge your phone or camera batteries, watch a movie or get some work done… it’s all possible on board the train. And what’s even better: more and more train companies are installing Wi-Fi so you can even post live updates as you journey by train. Knowing that you won’t affect your car battery by charging your devices is a bonus and taking advantage of free wi-fi also means that you won’t have to be concerned by huge data charges.

Holidays · Travel

Things to Do in and Around Richmond, Yorkshire

Richmond CastleAs I’ve said before, while I’m not in any hurry to get out amongst the germy masses and expose the kids to COVID, I am looking forward to get out on some day trips and short breaks, once things are safe again. Before lockdown, my Mum and I were actually talking about getting us all away on holiday together and renting somewhere for us four, my Mum and Dad and my sister and her fiance.

One of the places I found while I was looking was The Green Door Holiday Cottage in Richmond, which is a luxury cottage in Yorkshire. Usually, we’d head for the south coast for family holidays to places like Cornwall and Devon, but the thought of taking our travels north actually really appeals to me. With this in mind, I started looking at some things to do, in and around Richmord, for when we eventually get to take our trip.

Richmond Castle

Richmond Castle is an English Heritage site, right in the heart of Richmond and offers breathtaking views of the surrounding Dales. Even better, if you’re an English Heritage member, you and anyone included in your membership will get in for free, so you’ll be able to enjoy a lovely educational day out for very little outlay.

Foxglove Covert Local Nature Reserve

According to TripAdvisor, “Foxglove Covert Local Nature Reserve covers 100 acres of moorland edge adjacent to Cambrai Lines at Catterick and has a remarkable mix of habitats and species. The reserve contains semi-natural woodland, heathland, flower-rich grassland, streams, ponds, a lake, willow and Alder carr, coniferous woodlands and wet meadows. The patchwork of habitats across Foxglove Covert Local Nature Reserve is home to more than 2440 species. At the heart of the reserve is a modern, purpose-designed Field Centre, a great place to start your visit and learn more about the wildlife of Foxglove Covert.” Sounds like a wonderful place for a walk and a picnic!

The Forbidden Corner

The Forbidden Corner was originally a private folly. However, after popular demand, the site has been opened up to the public with four acres of all-out weird! Discover a unique labyrinth of pathways, tunnels, chambers and galleries throughout the woods. They’ll present a barrage of tricky challenges, including the occasional spray of water! Just keep your eyes peeled for the secret brass circles which reveal hidden markings and direct you on your mission. There’s also a lovely picnic area for when you need a break from the fantasy.

Travel

The Best of Dublin in a Weekend

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Traveling is one of life’s joys. From the mini-vacay to a trip of a lifetime, every adventure to a new destination is special and worth remembering.

If you only have two days to enjoy Dublin, for example, you will want to plan your itinerary carefully. There is so much to do and see that it is impossible to experience it all in two months, let alone two days! So, make the most of it.

If you get in on Friday night, check into your hotel and grab some dinner before heading out to the neighboring pub or bar for a Guinness. But leave your souvenir shopping with a Dublin luggage storage place so you don’t have to watch them.

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Saturday

  • Dublin Castle

Visiting Dublin Castle is like visiting over a dozen places at once. You can start at the Viking Excavation below the castle. It is where the Vikings defended the castle many years ago. Visit the Chapel Royal with its beautiful stained-glass windows and velvet floors, where it has been since 1242. 

The State Apartments come next where you can see the Grand Staircase, Apollo Room, Throne Room, Portrait Gallery, and more. Do not miss the neoclassical architecture in the State Corridor that was designed in 1758. The Wedgwood Room is also a must-see spot, with its colors of Wedgwood pottery and neoclassical style from 1777.

Before heading to the Dubh Linn Garden, stop at the Medieval Tower, which is the oldest structure in Dublin. It has been there since before 1204 and has been converted many times. The gardens are just to the south of the Chapel Royal where you can see four small gardens around the main one.

  • The Garda Museum

The Garda Museum is a fascinating place full of artifacts from the Republic of Ireland’s national police. The museum is hosted by a civilian employee and one Sergeant who can guide you to whatever you want to see. See photos dating back to 1812 to uniforms from the early 20th century, as well as items seized in their investigations like fake currency and an ATM skimming device. 

  • The Terrace Café

Stop in for lunch at the Terrace Café on the ground floor of the State Apartments. You can see a beautiful view of the gardens while you enjoy some delicious Irish cuisine. Some of the dishes you can choose from include seared salmon, roasted sirloin, mushroom ragout, lemon chicken, and roasted hake. Desserts include apple crumble, berries mascarpone, and lemon curd. 

  • The Revenue Museum

After lunch, head to the Revenue Museum just outside. It is located in the crypt of the Chapel Royal. Learn about the history of the currency of Ireland from old to new. See artifacts such as coins and paper money, audio-visual displays, and video games. Some of the popular exhibits include measuring instruments, counterfeit goods, and an illegal liquor still. 

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  • St. Patrick’s Cathedral 

St. Patrick’s Cathedral is next because it is right next door. You have plenty of time to explore the building that dates back to 1220. Anything that old deserves a closer look and maybe some selfies. You can explore on your own or take a group tour. Enjoy a trip up the staircase to the Cathedral organ, see 200-year old statues from clergies to sailors, and learn how to “Chance Your Arm.”

In 1492, there was a fight between the Fitzgeralds of Kildare and the Butlers of Ormonde. The Butlers were losing so they hid in the Chapter House at the Cathedral. The Fitzgeralds asked them to come out and make peace. The Butlers did not trust them, so the leader of the Fitzgeralds cut a hole in the door and stuck his arm through to shake hands. Peace was made after this. They call this door the Door of Reconciliation. 

  • Dinner at Spitalfields

It should be close to dinnertime by now so stop at Spitalfields, which is just a stone’s throw away on the Coombe. Have a Caesar salad, ember roasted beets, grilled sourdough with caviar, or tartare of Irish veal for a starter. Your main meal selections are mouthwatering as well.

You can have smoked pork chops with hazelnuts and currants, salmon with Hasselback potatoes and caviar, roasted cauliflower with cheese and truffles, or pork schnitzel with peas and smoked eel. Dessert choices include chocolate custard, orange super split, lemon & strawberry ice, or coconut & lime sorbet. 

  • Dublinia

Before heading back to the hotel for the night, visit Dublinia. This medieval experience is part of the Christ Church Cathedral on R108. See a historical reenactment of the Vikings and Medieval Dubliners, travel back in time to the Viking times, and see what it was like on the Viking warships. They even have a cool gift shop where you can get some unique souvenirs. 

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Sunday

  • National Leprechaun Museum

After breakfast at the hotel, head off to see some history. You can start off with the National Leprechaun Museum. This museum is sheerly entertaining and full of folklore. The tour guides will teach you the mythology of the place as well as the history of the leprechaun. They have a “giant” room where you can feel like you are a tiny leprechaun among huge furniture. 

  • National Museum of Ireland Archaeology

Over on Kildare, learn all about the beginning of Ireland at the archaeology branch of this museum. See the treasury with stunning gems and jewels or the Clontarf 1014, which has a plethora of artifacts from the ship. They also have a huge selection of gold from 2200 BC to 500 BC. 

  • National Museum of Ireland Natural History

On Merrion Street across the way, the history building has the flora and fauna of Ireland, and this museum is the place to go. See a monstrous hippo baring its giant teeth and an adorable family of badgers from 1911. The giant deer from the ice age, wooly mammoths, and spotted hyenas are also found here. 

  • The Little Museum of Dublin

It may be little, but it has a huge number of cool things to see. In fact, they have over 5,000 items! The guided tour was named the best museum tour in Ireland. See the first edition of Ulysses, a whole floor dedicated to U2, and James Joyce’s death mask. 

  • St. Stephen’s Green

Opened in 1880, this 22-acre park has a Victorian layout of lush greenery and vibrant flowers. Go for a boat ride in the lake, enjoy a walk, or learn more about the amazing sculptures all around the park. Don’t miss the waterfall. Grab some lunch nearby if you have time before you have to head to the airport. 

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Whether you are a newbie to Dublin or have visited many times, there is always something interesting to see and do in this capital city. The museums, parks, and castles are fun, but you may need to come back to visit the beaches like Dublin Bay, Sandymount, or Poolbeg Beach. Don’t forget the sunscreen!

Sources

How To Spend a Weekend in Dublin

https://www.aglobewelltravelled.com/2017/06/20/activities-for-a-weekend-in-dublin/

The Ultimate 2 Days In Dublin Itinerary

https://www.findingtheuniverse.com/2-day-dublin-itinerary/

A Weekend in Dublin – My Guide to 48 Hours in Dublin

https://independenttravelcats.com/3-days-in-dublin-ireland-dublin-itinerary/