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Personal fitness is one of those things that we all care about in an abstract sense, without always following it through to reality. While walking is low intensity, it still helps us get moving – ensuring we have the correct walking shoes to stay comfortable. It may keep us walking (take a look at runner click for the best walking shoes) past the baked goods in a grocery store, it may make us pick out the “diet” soda rather than the full-fat solution. It’s harder, though, to make it stick to the point of actually hitting the gym regularly.

After all, it takes the same time and money to buy a different type of soda – for example. There is even a momentary feeling of reward by making such a choice, which you can pat yourself on the back for as you select the option that you figure is better for you (whether you are correct on that is another point entirely). But the principle is the same.

Where Things Get Rough

Yet when it comes to working out and actually living more healthily rather than just the easy options as above – well, that’s a lot more to deal with, isn’t it? It’s a far bigger change, a more substantial shift in the way you do things and the impact it has on your existence. That kind of change is a lot harder to maintain. So how do you keep going when such a regime begins to feel too tough to be worth bothering with?

Solutions

One piece of advice you might hear is to start working out with a friend. On some levels, it makes a lot of sense – after all, it’s harder to do anything new in life if you’re going it alone. It’s also great to be able to share information with someone. You can swap exercise ideas, the exciting real AlgaeCal reviews that you found and talk the best way of using kinesiology tape with someone who’s in the same boat as you. (Bear in mind too that if you’re advising a friend on supplements, you should first take advice yourself from a doctor and advise them to do likewise).

The truth is, though, that nothing is without its challenges. So if you’re going to work out with a friend, it makes sense to be ready for the primary issue this can present:

One of You Will Always Be Doing A Little Better

When two people embark on something together, the likelihood is that one will find it easier (or get better results) than the other. This can lead to frustration and resentment on the part of the person left behind, if the situation is not addressed upfront.

If you’re the one who is finding a new routine easy, indicate to your workout buddy that it’s not a competition. You’re both aiming for goals and it’s not about defeating one another.

If you’re the one lagging behind, don’t resent your friend. It’s petty. Just try and bear in mind that different people react in different ways, at different paces. Sometimes you will be the one behind in the dust, but in other activities, you might streak ahead. It’s all about balance and perspective.

If you feel you must be in competition, then be in competition with other people at the gym – not the person you’re close with!