There’s a few things I can almost guarantee when I see my friend Kelly popping up on my Facebook feed. Firstly, she always looks stunning. Secondly, she always looks happy. Lastly, she’s usually with her friend Oli. Their Facebook banter never fails to amuse me and they say those hideously insulting things to each other that you could only ever say to a friend who you absolutely adore. Kelly and I went to senior school together and she’s one of the nicest people you could hope to meet and Oli means the absolute world to her.

Kelly and Oli

So, why am I telling you all this? Well, last week, Kelly told me that her beloved friend has been diagnosed with a very aggressive form of lymphoma and is currently undergoing treatment at University College Hospital London. Obviously, she’s devastated and her main concern is to see her friend well again, but she’s also on a bit of a mission at the moment. You see, Oli was due to go on holiday tomorrow and has his flights booked with Easy Jet, but the company has refused to refund him because it ‘goes against their policy’. The best they can offer him is a re-booking at a later date, and they’re failing to see the absolute ridiculousness of asking a cancer patient to know when they’re going to be well enough to go on holiday again.

To be honest, I’m sick of these companies and their ‘policies’.

EasyJet is less than 20 years old, having been founded in 1995 by the infamous Stelios and as of last year generated revenue of almost 4 and a half billion pounds and a net profit of £478 million. Pounds out of the pockets of normal, hard-working people like Oli who don’t want to pay through the nose for their holidays and in doing so have made Stelios a very, very wealthy man. Real people with real lives and real illnesses, who’ve made EasyJet what it is today.

If this was a matter of someone having a cold, or simply changing their minds, I could understand EasyJet standing fast over their decision to keep Oli’s money and I realise that in legal terms, once a purchase is made a customer has agreed to the companies terms and conditions, but what would it take to just employ a bit of common decency for a passenger, someone who SHOULD be a valued customer, in what’s probably the worst few months of his life?

But, what do EasyJet care? This is just more money in their pockets and another person screwed over. There are millions more passengers just waiting to hop on their planes because their prices are relatively low, but I guarantee you that the £500 that Oli paid for his flight is worth a hell of a lot more to him than it is to a multi-billion pound company.

I for one am disgusted and won’t be travelling by EasyJet in the future, and I hope my friends and readers also think long and hard before paying money to a company which is willing to be so heartless. I’ve never met Oli, but I want to take this opportunity to send him love and well-wishes and best of luck with his treatment, and I really hope that EasyJet think again about their unwillingness to help a poorly young man.

(If you want to find Oli on Twitter, his handle is @oliverdickson. I’m sure he’d be really grateful for some support and RT’s of his tweets to EasyJet)